Preparing for your site for Sound Testing

Preparing for your site for Sound Testing

To record accurate test measurements, we need to ensure that the correct site conditions are achieved prior to the precompletion sound testing. Relatively quiet conditions are required on site throughout the testing. Any site operatives working in the testing area will have to leave temporarily and any noisy works in the vicinity of the test areas including external site activity such as groundworks, drilling and banging will need to be halted, otherwise it may result in a sound test failure.  We always provide a full sound testing checklist within our quotation which identifies what actions need to be undertaken prior to the sound test.

sound testing equipment

The condition the buildings/dwelling is very important, as they can influence the results of the test. The following stages for sound testing will help preparation and also assess the point at which completed buildings can be tested. Generally before the test the parts of the building/rooms either side of the separating wall or separating floor should be complete. Particular attention should be paid to the following:

  1. All separating floors and walls and all flanking walls and floors should be complete.
  2. All wall and floor junctions should be complete – to include flanking strips etc.
  3. All wall finishes should be complete, this should include skirting’s being in place. This does not include decorative finishes such as paint.
  4. Floors must be bare and no carpets should be laid – where a concrete floor with bonded resilient cover is to be fitted with wood based flooring. In this case, the test sample resilient floor cover should be tested with a wood based floor covering laid over the test sample area.
  5. Windows should be installed with all glass fitted.
  6. Trickle vents should be in place and closed.
  7. All doors should be fully fitted and closed. This includes internal doors and external doors fully fitted with doors seals.
  8. Services should be complete and any voids around ducts finished.
  9. Electrical sockets should be fitted.
  10. A 240V electricity supply should be available to all the test plots.
  11. There should be no noise during the test other than from the testing equipment.
  12. The test plots and adjacent areas within the building should be quiet for the duration of the test.
  13. No work should be carried out or noise made in the building at the time of the test.
  14. Site workers should not enter the building or be in the parts of the building undergoing a test.

We try to offer a ‘one stop acoustic solution’ visa our acoustic design service, sample sound testing and site visits.

If you would like APT Sound Testing to review your sites acoustic construction, then please speak to us about our acoustic design service, alternatively if you just require sound insulation testing please contact us at: info@aptsoundtesting.co.uk

Good Acoustic Design

Good Acoustic Design to Pass Your Sound Insulation Testing

We have carried our hundreds of acoustic design reviews and sound insulation tests, so we are well placed to help you overcome any potential problems to achieve compliance with Building Regulations Part E.

It is essential that good acoustic design is actioned from the offset of any new construction project. When designing acoustic partitions you will need to consider the following

architect drafting a house blueprint

  1. The careful design of floor plans to avoid habitual rooms being placed side by side.
  2. The mass and density of products that you are using.
  3. Using good design detailing to ensure the careful isolation of materials.
  4. The whole construction detail and how it is made up.
  5. Undertaking careful acoustic detailing of junctions between walls, ceilings and floors.
  6. Using acoustic wall ties in cavity walls.
  7. Types of doors in sound resisting walls.
  8. Containment of noise within noisy parts of a building such as lift shafts.
  9. Positions of sockets and flues on opposite sides of walls to ensure they don’t sit back to back.
  10. Sealing and filling of joints.
  11. The use of cavity closer’s on window/door reveals.
  12. Careful sealing of service penetrations.
  13. Designing to reduce potential reverberation in common parts of buildings such as corridors and entrance areas and the subsequent use of absorbent materials.

Unfortunately unless the acoustic design has been taken into account, the floor and ceiling partitions can be the main pathways for sound transmission.  The first type of sound transmission is airborne sound such as TV and speech; and the second is the passage of impact sounds such as footfall or children’s toys being dropped on the floor above.  Achieving good airborne and impact sound isolation requires careful acoustic design considerations.

APT Sound Testing can advise on all types of acoustic design, whether it’s accomplished during initial construction or during a refurbishment/renovation project. We also undertake UKAS accredited sound testing providing a ‘one stop’ solution for all your acoustic requirements.

If you would like more information in regards to good acoustic design and/or sound testing please follow our blog at: http://soundtestinguk.blogspot.co.uk or contact us at: info@aptsoundtesting.co.uk and 07775623464 or visit our website at: www.aptsoundtesting.co.uk