Sample Sound Testing

SAMPLE SOUND TESTING 

Sample sound testing is the cornerstone of acoustic design when it comes to the conversion of commercial buildings into residential developments. We can undertake sample sound testing to the existing buildings walls and floors to check the sound insulation performance of the existing dividing partitions. Thereafter, once the sound levels have been established and targeted acoustic design can be undertaken to ensure compliance with Building Regulations Part E.

Sound_Testing_Flats

We offer a proactive approach to acoustic design, onsite construction checks and sound testing. This ensures your company receives professional advice every step of the way, with an on-going continual consideration of cost. Our main acoustic services consist of the following.

Sample Sound Insulation Testing

We undertake sample sound testing to identify the sound levels for the existing partitions. Thereafter a more targeted acoustic design can be undertaken to the partitions saving time and money through the construction process.

Sample_Sound__Testing

Acoustic Consultancy  

We have considerable experience in all matters related to architectural acoustic design and detailing. We can help develop the initial acoustic design of the project from the initial design scheme stage, in particular acoustic isolation, and interior acoustics. We also use the latest Norsonic equipment analysers and sound sources for conventional and binaural acoustic measurements.

Site Visits

We offer site visits which allow you (the client) and your contractor to feel confident about the outcome of testing at the end of the build. The site visits let us check that the installation teams are installing the acoustic materials as per manufacturers avoiding crucial onsite mistakes. You can often have a compliant design which still fails due to poor workmanship; the site survey visits negate the risk of sound test failure.

Acoustic_Site_Survey

Precompletion Sound Insulation Testing

We undertake the final precompletion testing to ensure compliance with Building Regulations Part E and achieve building control sign off for the acoustic elements of the project.

If you would like more information in regards to sound testing or acoustic design, please follow our blog at: http://soundtestinguk.blogspot.co.uk/, or contact us at: info@aptsoundtesting.co.uk or Darren on 07775623464, or visit our website at: www.aptsoundtesting.co.uk

Acoustic Design and Sound Testing

Acoustic Design and Sound Testing

We are currently experiencing a large rise in the amount of housing stock that’s requiring sound testing throughout the UK. As commercial buildings such as offices etc. are converted into residential dwellings sound testing then becomes are requirement under Part E of building regulations. We have carried out a large amount of sound testing in office conversions with varying success as office buildings are not usually designed with acoustics in-mind.

Noise_Problems_Failed_Sound_Testing

To reduce the chance of a sound test failure, it is imperative that flanking transmission is considered at the design stage and any construction detailing is specified to minimise any potential of noise flanking which will downgrade the acoustic performance. Good detailing at the design stage will minimise this effect and optimise the overall levels of acoustic privacy achieved. If designing for residential units, design advice on flanking details must be followed to maximise the possibility of achieving the specified acoustic performance. It is imperative that the design advice is followed, otherwise the site sound insulation values may not meet the performance criteria required and subsequent expensive remedial treatment may be required.

When offices are converted into dwellings we often undertake sample sound testing to check the existing sound levels prior to the commencement of works, once we have established the sound test results we can then come up with a more cost effective design to comply with Part E of Building Regulations.

Historically we have found that if the floor structure is a typical 200mm concrete slab the sample airborne results are coming close to the requirements of Part E without any modifications to the existing slab; however, the impact results are poor. This is because the airborne sound is broken down by the mass of the concrete slab, therefore sounds such as speech & TV etc. are minimised. Unfortunately, impact sound results are poor due to the lack of isolation within the slab, therefore the sound travels straight through the slab to the area below. Sound such as people walking can be very loud and unacceptable.

To help reduce potential control noise issues APT Sound Testing can undertake an acoustic  design review of the floors after sample sound testing to ensure both the airborne and impact sound tests pass Part E of Building Regulations. Using our extensive knowledge regarding the way different materials and construction methods can influence the results of sound testing we can offer easy to follow acoustic advice on the most awkward developments.

Acoustic_Design_Service

If you would like more information in regards to sound testing please follow our blog at: http://soundtestinguk.blogspot.co.uk or contact us at: info@aptsoundtesting.co.uk and 07775623464 or visit our website at: www.aptsoundtesting.co.uk

 

Sound Testing to Office Conversions

Sound Testing to Office Conversions 

When it comes to refurbishment projects such as office block conversions or large houses subdivided into dwellings, we can undertake a sample sound test of the existing wall and floor construction. Once we have established the sound levels for the existing construction we can then look at extent of the acoustic upgrades to attain Part E Compliance. This is much more targeted way to formulate a more cost effective and accurate acoustic  design as we know the sound insulation performance of the existing partitions.

sound testing equipment

The sound insulation levels required to pass Part E are usually 45dB for airborne wall and floors and 62dB for Impact Sound Testing on new build, however sometimes a higher target may be required in-line with the Code for Sustainable Homes; this is usually in defined in the following figures +3, 5 & 8dB, this means if its plus 5dB you will need to achieve 50dB for airborne and 57dB for impact sound testing.  Obviously if you need to comply with the Code for Sustainable Homes then special attention must be shown to the acoustic design from the offset to reduce the chance of sound testing failure.

architect drafting a house blueprint

architect drafting a house blueprint

The amount of sound testing you require depends on the size of the development. All new build properties and conversions require 10% of each party wall/floor construction type to be tested, i.e. if you have built a pair of semi-detached houses you would be required to undertake 2 airborne wall tests. If you have up to 10 flats you would require 1 x 6 pack, consisting of 2 airborne wall, 2 airborne floor & 2 Impact sound tests – known as a 6 pack)  However if you have 11 units this would rise to 12 Sound Tests or 2 x 6 pack. Also, if you have many different wall or floor types you will be required to undertake more tests to satisfy Building Regulations Part E.

There are many ways to improve the chances of passing your sound test at the first attempt, they are:

  • Ensure all penetrations are fully sealed where they terminate through floors and they are adequately boxed with acoustic quilt and two layers of plasterboard.
  • Avoid the use of lightweight blocks in the inner envelope construction as sound will travel both vertically and horizontally from dwelling to dwelling.
  • The use of resilient suspended ceilings will help improve the performance of the floor partition.
  • Ensure all support steels/timbers are carefully boxed out where they travel from flat to flat vertically and horizontally.
  • Use a high quality resilient acoustic membrane on top of the floor to improve the impact performance of a floor.

Due to the overwhelming variety of material designs and combinations due to varying constructions, it is impossible to cover all problems in a short article such as this; however in our experience if the acoustic design is taken into consideration from the offset of the project, then it usually results in a successful sound testing and compliance with Building Regulations Part E.

If you have a project that requires sound testing in London then contact us now, we can propose a sound testing schedule that should comply with Part E. Please contact us at: info@aptsoundtesting.co.uk or call us at 07775623464

Sound Testing on London Developments

Sound Testing on London Developments 

Sound Insulation Testing is undertaken near the end of a project to show that the party wall and floors meet the Building Regulations Part E stipulated. The method for sound testing for airborne and impact sound insulation is in full accordance with the suggested methods presented in BS EN ISO 140-parts 4 & 7: 1998.

Detached houses don’t require sound insulation testing, however if the house has been built on to the end of an existing house and/or terrace it usually requires 2 airborne wall tests, one test on the lower floor which is usually the living room  ad a second test on the 1st floor through the bedroom walls.

sound_transmission_through_floors

Apartment blocks usually require airborne and impact sound insulation tests. Airborne sound testing is normally required between horizontally and vertically separated pairs of rooms i.e. the wall and floor partitions. The sound tests are undertaken by using a sound source, amplifier and loudspeaker to generate a high noise level in one room (the source room). Noise measurements are then taken in both the source and receiver rooms using a prescribed number of source and microphone positions. The background levels in the receiver room are measured and the reverberation time in the receiver room is also measured. From the results, the airborne sound insulation (DnT,w + Ctr) is calculated and compared to the requirements of Approved Document E.

When undertaking sound testing for floors, impact sound testing may also be required for vertically separated dwellings. Impact sound insulation testing is undertaken using a “tapping machine”, which drops a series of weights/small hammers onto the floor of the upper room. The noise level in the lower (receiver) room is measured for a prescribed number of source and microphone locations. The background levels in the receiver room are measured and the reverberation time in the receiver room is also measured. From the results, the impact sound insulation (L’nT,w) is calculated and compared to the requirements of Approved Document E.

Sound_Testing_Flats

If you have a project that requires sound testing in London then contact us now, we can propose a sound testing schedule that should comply with Part E. Please contact us at: info@aptsoundtesting.co.uk or call us at 07775623464

Improving Sound Transmission Through Floor Partitions

Improving Sound Transmission Through Floor Partitions

In our experience, refurbishment projects usually achieve 30-35dB for airborne sound and 70dB for Impact Sound, if the existing construction has not been acoustically upgraded. These figures do not meet the required 43dB & 64dB as stipulated in Part E of Building Regulations. As sound double every 10dB this is a massive failure and acoustic improvements must be made. Many existing construction consist of a similar construction as shown in as detail 1 below.

Detail 1: Existing Floor Partitions Rated At Approx. 30dB

Failed_sound_Testing_Due_to_existing_floor_Construction_

 

Improving Existing Floor Partitions

There are many ways to reduce the airborne and impact sound transmission through floor partitions, this usually means adding density and isolation to the floor construction. This can be as simple as adding 100mm acoustic wool between the floor joists, then adding resilient bars to the bottom of the existing joists. To the bottom of the acoustic bars add 2 layers of 12.5mm soundboard. to the top of the joists install 18mm floorboard, then an acoustic resilient mat. Then the add the final floor finish e.g. 22mm engineered wooden floors – as per detail 2 shown below). If the aforementioned system is installed strictly inline with manufacturers details it should satisfy the sound insulation requirements of Building Regulations Part E.

Detail 2: Acoustic Flooring Partition Upgrade

Good Conversion Diagram - 15-01-16

Taking the above into account is it essential that robust acoustic design is addressed  from the start of the refurbishment project to prevent potential delays with the building handover due to potential sound testing failures. We can offer acoustic design advice, site survey visits,  sample sound testing and precompletion sound testing to help you achieve successful sound testing at the first attempt.

If you would like advice on your acoustic design or require sound insulation testing in London, please contact us now on 07775623464 or contact us at info@aptsoundtesting.co.uk.

 

 

 

Designing for Sound Insulation

Designing for Sound Insulation

Many of the dwellings in throughout the UK consist of large houses or office blocks that have been converted into flats. Unfortunately during the design stage of the project designing for sound insulation is not always shown the highest priority, so many converted dwellings fail their precompletion testing.

Acoustic_Design_Service

We have helped many of our clients achieve compliance with Part E, by undertaking some simple steps. We can undertake an initial sample sound test of the existing wall and floor construction to ascertain the existing sound insulation levels. Once we have established the sound levels for the existing construction, we can then look at extent of the acoustic upgrades to attain Part E Compliance. This is much more effective than just forwarding an acoustic design that may be to excessive and expensive, especially if the existing floor and/or wall only needs to improve by a minimal amount such as 1-3dB. By having the existing sound levels of the partitions we can recommend targeted, acoustic upgrades to comply with Building Regulations Part E.

Even though the sound insulation levels required to pass Part E for refurbishment projects are less stringent than new build projects – instead of 45dB for airborne its 43dB (2dB less), and for instead of 62dB for Impact Sound Testing its 64dB on new build (2dB more) it is still essential that the acoustic design is shown the highest priory from the start of the project.

Noise_Problems_Failed_Sound_Testing

In our experience, refurbishment projects usually achieve 30-35dB for airborne sound and 70dB for Impact Sound during the sample sound test – if the existing construction has not been acoustically upgraded. These figures do not meet the required 43dB & 64dB as stipulated in Part E of Building Regulations. As sound double every 10dB this is a massive failure and major acoustic improvements must be made.

On all new or converted developments, is it essential that good acoustic design is addressed right from the start of the refurbishment project, so the building passes the sound testing at the first attempt and prevents delays in handover.

If you would like advice on your acoustic design or require sound testing in London, please contact us now on 07775623464 or contact us at info@aptsoundtesting.co.uk.

Acoustic Design Advice for my Sound Insulation Test

Acoustic Design Advice for my Sound Insulation Test

We at APT Sound Testing pride ourselves on offering a comprehensive acoustic design service to help you development attain compliance with Building Regulations Part E at the first attempt. If you send through the relevant drawings such as sections and floor plans during the design stages of the project, we can check the design is adequate and if there appears to be any junctions or details where ‘noise flanking’ may occur, we can then advise if any changes are required to lower the chance of sound test failures.

Acoustic_Design_Service

There are many factors to consider when considering good acoustic design, and they are usually split up into five key factors. If used together or in various combinations they will improve sound insulation properties over a wide range of frequencies. The main factors are:

  1. Mass
  2. Isolation
  3. Absorption
  4. Resilience
  5. Stiffness

Coupled_wall_construction

Also, noise flanking transmission may in some cases be the dominant pathway between adjoining dwellings, especially in existing buildings where you are planning to convert offices/large houses into flats. Here are just a few of the potential noise flanking areas:

  1. Structural Steels
  2. Windows built very close to Internal partitions
  3. Inner leaf of the external wall
  4. External wall cavities
  5. External façade or outer leaf
  6. Roof structure

APT Sound Testing can advise on all types of acoustic design, whether it’s during the initial design of a new build project and/or undertaking sample sound testing and design during a refurbishment/renovation project. We also undertake UKAS accredited sound insulation testing providing a ‘one stop’ solution for all your acoustic requirements.

If you would like more information on our full range of our acoustic services please contact us now at info@aptsoundtesting.co.uk or call Darren direct on 07775 623464.

Upgrading Floor Partitions to Pass Sound Testing

Upgrading Floor Partitions to Pass Sound Testing

In our experience of undertaking hundreds of sample of sound tests throughout London and the Home Counties, refurbishment projects usually achieve 30-35dB for airborne sound and 70dB for Impact Sound, if the existing construction has not been acoustically upgraded. Unfortunately, the aforementioned figures do not meet the required 43dB & 64dB as stipulated in Part E of Building Regulations. As sound double every 10dB this is a massive failure and acoustic improvements must be made. Many existing construction consist of a similar construction as shown in as detail 1 below.

Detail 1: Existing Floor Partitions Rated at Approx. 30dB

Failed_sound_Testing_Due_to_existing_floor_Construction_

Improving Existing Floor Partitions

To reduce airborne and impact sound transmission this usually means adding density and isolation to the floor construction. This can be as simple as adding a drop ceiling consisting of 125mm timber frame. The top of the frame must be a minimum of 25mm below the existing ceiling finish – such as lathe and plaster. Then, to the inside of the timber frame add 100mm of Acoustic Wool and two layers of sound-board tacked to the bottom of the timber frame – all boards to be lapped. This should improve your sound test results by approx. 10-15dB depending on the existing site conditions and quality of the installation – as per Detail 2 below:

Detail 2: Acoustic Flooring Partition Upgrade

ceiling_upgrade_to_pass_sound_test

Taking the above into account is it essential that good acoustic design is addressed right from the start of the refurbishment project, so it prevents delays in handover, i.e. to prevent the dwelling failing the sound testing at building control signoff stage.– a common problem.

If you would like advice on your acoustic design or require sound insulation testing in London, please contact us now on 07775623464 or contact us at info@aptsoundtesting.co.uk.

 

Improving Sound Insulation on Conversion Projects

Improving Sound Insulation on Conversion Projects

In cities throughout the UK there are a huge amount of conversion projects where large Victorian or Georgian houses – or more recently office blocks) have been converted into flats or rooms for residential purposes. Unfortunately designing for sound insulation is not always shown the highest priority on these types of projects, so many converted dwellings suffer from adverse noise transference between the floor and wall partitions. This can be extremely stressful to the occupant’s well-being is a major cause for concern.

architect drafting a house blueprint

architect drafting a house blueprint

We have helped many of our clients achieve compliance with Part E, by undertaking some simple steps. We can undertake an initial sample sound test of the existing wall and floor construction to ascertain the existing sound insulation levels. Once we have established the sound levels for the existing construction, we can then look at extent of the acoustic upgrades to attain Part E Compliance. This is much more effective than just forwarding an acoustic design that may be to excessive and expensive, especially if the existing floor and/or wall only needs to improve by a minimal amount such as 1-3dB. By having the existing sound levels of the partitions we can recommend targeted, acoustic upgrades to comply with Building Regulations Part E.

Sound_Insulation_Testing_Equipment

=The sound insulation levels required to pass Part E for refurbishment projects are less stringent than new build projects. Instead of 45dB for airborne its 43dB (2 dB less), and for instead of 62dB for Impact Sound Testing its 64dB on new build (2 dB more).

Taking the above into account is it essential that good acoustic design is addressed right from the start of the refurbishment project, so it prevents delays in handover, i.e. to prevent the dwelling failing the sound testing at building control sign off stage.– a common problem.

We have offered design advice on hundreds of conversion projects, so we have the experience to help you comply with Building Regulation Part E and achive a sucsessful sound test. If you would like advice on your acoustic design or require sound insulation testing in London, please contact us now on 07775623464 or contact us at info@aptsoundtesting.co.uk.

 

HOW MANY SOUND TESTS DO I NEED ON MY PROJECT

HOW MANY SOUND TESTS DO I NEED ON MY PROJECT

Our clients often ask ‘how many sound tests do I need on my project’? Part E stipulates that one set of sound tests needs to be undertaken for every ten flats or houses, provided the construction system is the same, if it’s not then you may be required to undertake a set of tests on each type of construction.

A set means 6  sound tests, this should include two locations where the party element (wall or floor) is tested. This is equivalent to two individual tests when assessing the performance of a wall this means 2 airborne wall, 2 airborne floor and 2 impact sound tests as a minimum wherever possible. Wherever possible tests must be undertaken between habitable spaces (e.g. bedrooms and living rooms. Here is a quick summary of the amount of tests required per type of project.

Semi-Detached Houses:

On a pair of semi-detached houses, two airborne sound insulation tests on a pair of separating walls would be required.

Sound_Testing_Semi_Detached_House

Flats (Up to 10 flats)

On flats a 6 Pack would normally be required, this would usually comprise of two airborne sound insulation tests on separating walls; two airborne sound insulation tests of separating floors and two impact sound transmission tests of separating floors.

Sound_Testing_Flats

Rooms for Residential Purposes (up to 10 Rooms)

On student accommodation, hotel rooms & care homes a set of tests would usually comprise of one airborne sound insulation test of a separating wall; one airborne sound insulation test on a separating floor and one impact sound transmission test of a separating floor

Sound_Testing_Hotels

If you are unsure of the amount of sound tests required on your development, please contact us now at: info@aptsoundtesting.co.uk or call me direct on 07775623464.

Here is a link to our website www.aptsoundtesting.co.uk  which shows you our full range of services in compliance with the latest Building Regulations.