Preparing Your Project For Sound Testing

Preparing Your Project For Sound Testing

There are many important things to remember as you near completion on your project, one of which is to adequately prepare your London project for Sound Testing. This means that the dwellings and the ‘habitable rooms’ i.e. living rooms and bedrooms should be the final finishing stage – usually a week or two prior to completion.

Sound_Insulation_Test_London

To help our clients prepare for compliance with Approved Document Part E throughout London, we have provided a site preparation checklist – shown below. It’s worth noting that where items are not in place this will negatively affect the sound insulation performance of the dwellings:

  1. Internal & external doors and windows must be hung, glazed & close-able on the latch.
  2. Trickle vents and other ventilation systems should be fitted and closed.
  3. All wall, floors & ceiling constructions must be completed
  4. Skirting boards and cornice should all be completed
  5. Electrical sockets, TV Aerial sockets & light switches should be fitted
  6. Rooms must be clear of building materials, tools & unfurnished
  7. No cosmetic floor coverings should be fitted (i.e. laminate, carpet, vinyl, ceramics)
  8. No noisy operations such as drilling, cutting or ground-works to occur nearby during testing
  9. Provision of 240v 50Hz mains power is required within all the dwellings under test 110v cannot be used.

To attain compliance with Approved Document E one set of tests needs to be undertaken for every ten flats or houses provided the construction system is the same. A set means that the test should include two locations where the party element (wall or floor) is tested. This is equivalent to two individual tests when assessing the performance of a wall – airborne performance only) and four individual tests when assessing a floor (two airborne and two impact tests).

All sound insulation tests must be undertaken between habitable spaces (e.g. bedrooms, living rooms) and not to or from common spaces such as stairwells and corridors. Approved Document E 2003 states that a minimum of 10% of all party walls and floors is sound tested for every construction group or sub-group; however, where variations in the construction such as a different wall and/or floor type then further testing may be required.

APT Sound Testing provides a full range of Sound Testing in London in compliance with Approved Document E. if you would like more information please contact us at info@aptsoundtesting.co.uk or call me direct on 07775623464.

Sound Testing on Conversion Projects

Sound Testing on Conversion Projects

In our experience acoustic design and sound testing on conversion projects don’t need to be problematic. If you are currently in the process converting offices and/or houses info flats or ‘Rooms for Residential Use’, then its very important that the acoustic design is embraced from the start of the project.

Air Pressure Testing  have many years of experience in providing acoustic design and sound insulation testing in a comprehensive package designed to help you meet the legal requirements of Building Regulations Part E.

Acoustic Design Advice

As a  multi UKAS accredited company, you can be sure that all our services are undertaken to the highest laboratory standards. The types of projects that need to comply with Approved Document E for conversion projects or ‘Rooms for Residential Use’ are:

  1. House to flat conversions
  2. Commercial building to flat conversions.
  3. Hotels and hostels
  4. Boarding houses
  5. Halls of residence
  6. Residential homes

We can offer you the following services to help your development comply with Approved Document E:

  1. We review the architect’s drawings to check the required acoustic principles have been followed and meet the requirements of Approved Document E.
  2. We undertake a site visit and analyse the current state of building construction. And to check there are no site specific construction problems that may affect the acoustic performance of the building.
  3. We under take sample sound testing to check the sound insulation properties of the buildings existing floors and walls.
  4. We will provide you with a full and detailed acoustic design report that outlines which acoustic treatments taking into account the most cost and buildability.
  5. We will provide ongoing support and site visits to assist the builder/consultant to ensuring that the level of detail required is met and deal with any ongoing issues that may arise.
  6. We will undertake the final precompletion sound testing to achieve compliance with Approved Document E.

We’ve successfully guided our clients through hundreds of different conversion projects helping our clients achieve compliance with Approved Document E.

If you would like advice on your acoustic design or sound testing in London, please contact us now at info@aptsoundtesting.co.uk or call us on 07775623464.

Airborne and Impact Sound Tests

Airborne and Impact Sound Tests

You are required to undertake two types of sound testing to comply with Building Regulations Part E, they are Airborne and Impact sound tests. Airborne sound tests are undertake on wall and floors and impact tests are undertaken on floor only.

To test the sound insulation properties of a floor or wall via airborne sound testing, you need to provide a sound source which consists of an amplifier and loud speaker is set up on one side of the wall or floor partition that is to be tested. We then turn the setting to turn on Pink noise. Pink noise sounds like the static that can be heard on a radio that is off station. Pink noise is used  because it is made up of a wall of sound that has a wide spectrum of frequencies. This provides an indication of sound insulation performance for a wide range of sounds that may be experienced within a dwelling from musical instruments to loud TV noise sources.

sound testing

The pink noise is measured in the room which contains the speaker or sound source using a Class 1 Norsonic sound level meter; thereafter the noise is measured on the other side of the wall or floor partition that is being tested. In layman’s terms the difference between these two levels is the amount of sound that is stopped by the sound insulating qualities if the wall or floor partition/s. The result is then corrected and adjusted depending on the echo or reverberation time within the receiving room, and any background noise such as builders work noise etc.

To test the impact sound insulation performance of a floor, a Norsonic tapping machine which consists of five small hammers that are dropped onto the floor to simulate foot fall, is placed on the floor. The resultant noise in the room below is measured with a Norsonic Class 1 sound level meter and the amount of noise that passes through the floor is the impact sound transmission level and is expressed as a single number. This result is then corrected and adjusted depending on the reverberation time of the rooms as well as any background noise to give the impact sound transmission result (LnT,w).

Impact Sound Testing

Both types of sound tests results are then compared to the performance criteria of Approved Document E, which stipulates that airborne sound needs to achieve 45dB for new build & 43dB for conversion projects. To achieve a pass for impact sound testing you need to achieve 62dB for new build & 64dB conversions.

If you have a project that’s needs acoustic design advice or needs precompletion sound testing then please contact us at: info@aptsoundtesting.co.uk or call us directly on 07775623464.

Sound Testing Services for New Dwellings

Sound Testing Services  for new dwellings

Sound Testing Services became mandatory in England & Wales in 2003, when Approved Document E was updated. Approved Document E requires new and converted to achieve a reasonable level of sound insulation between dwellings. The easiest way simplest way to comply with the requirements of Approved Document E; is to have on-site pre-completion sound insulation testing carried out on your project.

Many of our clients are clients are apprehensive prior to having to undertake pre-completion sound insulation tests.  This is often down to the fear of failure; however if the the acoustic design specification has been undertaken from the offset of the project and is closely followed during the construction phase then he chance of potential failure is greatly reduced.

sound testing equipment

Approved Document E requires a minimum of one ‘set’ of tests for every ten units in each group and/or sub group.  This is usually broken down to two airborne wall, two airborne floor and two impact sound tests. If you have a development of 25 houses, with five different sub-groups (5 units in each) then you would usually conduct 5 ‘sets’ of tests.  If no separating floors are available, i.e. in semi-detached or terraced houses, one set of tests would consist of two airborne tests of separating walls only.

If the precompletion test results do not satisfy the performance criteria of Approved Document E, then our test engineer will attempt to determine the possible causes of failure. This may be to do with construction detailing around services or at junctions, or simply, poor acoustic design. Once a specific reason for failure has been determined, we can then advise the client on remedial actions that can be undertaken.

If you have a project that’s needs acoustic design advice or needs precompletion sound testing then please contact us at: info@aptsoundtesting.co.uk or call us directly on 07775623464.

The Two Types of Floor Noise

The Two Types of Floor Noise

Under Building Regulations Part E there are two distinct types of floor noise to consider; they are:

  • Airborne Noise (for example speech and music)
  • Impact Noise (for example footsteps directly on the floor above)

By utilising our extensive knowledge of different materials and construction Even if both types of sound appear to be are excessive through the ceiling/floor, then there are some easy acoustic design upgrades that should reduce the sound levels and improve your sound test results. By utilising our extensive knowledge of different materials and construction we can forward a simple, cost effective solution for wall and/or floor upgrade. Where our clients have followed our advice they have achieved a 100% success rate for sound insulation testing – ensuring compliance with Part E of Building Regulations.

noise_flanking

The sound testing procedure is quite simple and our engineer will be happy to explain this on site. Essentially, for party walls there is one type of sound insulation test which is airborne sound test and for compartment floors there are two types of sound insulation tests which are airborne and impact sound insulation tests. The airborne sound insulation test is carried out by means of a loudspeaker emitting a steady source of noise on one side of the partition (wall or floor) to be measured. The corresponding sound level is measured on the other side of the partition. Impact sound insulation tests are carried out by means of a tapping machine placed on the floor sample to be measured and the noise measured in the room or space below

All our engineers carry out the sound test measurements in full accordance with the measurement procedures of BS EN ISO 140-4:1998[3] for field measurements with a single figure DnTw and LnTw in accordance with BS EN ISO 717. As per the new regulations the Spectrum Adaptation Ctr which is a correction factor calculated from the measured DnT.w and the corresponding third octave band DnT values.  It uses a set of weighting levels in third octave bands derived from a road traffic noise spectrum.  It is applied to airborne test results and is measured in dB.

We can carry out final pre-completion sound testing on all new build or conversion projects throughout London. If you would like advice on your acoustic design or sound testing please contact us now at info@aptsoundtesting.co.uk or call me now on 07775623464.

Sound Insulation Testing Terminology (3 of 3)

Sound Insulation Testing Terminology (3 of 3)

Often confusion can arise from the large amount of ‘terms’ used in conjunction with acoustic design and sound insulation testing. To help with this we have made a list of the following terms for clarity – this is the last blog in the series:

Isolation – This is a strategy to limit the number and type of rigid connections between elements of construction.

L’nT,w – This is the weighted standardized impact sound pressure level. A single-number quantity (weighted) to characterise the impact sound insulation of floors, in accordance with BS EN ISO 717-2: 1997.

sound testing

Mass – This is a physical quantity that expresses the amount of matter in a body. Walls and floors may be described in terms of the surface density (mass per unit area, kg/m2) of the wall face or the floor surface, which is the sum of the surface densities of each component of the construction. The density of materials is expressed as mass per unit volume, kg/m3, which can be provided via the core structure and linings such as in-situ concrete or solid dense block walls.

Mass per unit area (or surface density) – This is is expressed in terms of kilograms per square metre (kg/m2). This is often used to describe boards, panels, flooring and dry linings (see gypsum based board).

Resilience – This can reduce structural vibration transmission and still maintain material performance and overall dimensions, examples include floating floor treatments such as resilient battens or cradles, or resilient ceiling bars.

Resilient ceiling bars – This acoustic solution is generally metal based and vary in thickness from 11 mm to 30 mm. They are mounted perpendicular to the joist span direction and can increase both airborne and impact sound insulation. Care should be taken to ensure that the ceiling board fixings into the resilient bar do not come into contact with the joists and reduce the potential performance.

Resilient noggin – This is a small section of resilient ceiling bar which is used to assist in bracing non load bearing partitions.

Rw – This is a single-number quantity (weighted) which characterises the airborne sound insulation of a building element from measurements undertaken in a laboratory, in accordance with BS EN ISO 717-1: 1997

Sound Insulation Testing – Sound Insulation Testing is required near the end of a development to show that the performance of the party wall and floor partitions meet the standards as stipulated in Building Regulations Approved Document E. The testing methods for airborne and impact sound insulation is in full accordance with the suggested methods presented in BS EN ISO 140-parts 4 & 7: 1998.

Stiffness – This is can improve low frequency sound insulation, for example in floors, by reducing the potential for deflection or movement of the primary structure, therefore the correct spacing and depth of joists is important.

We hope the last blog in the Sound Insulation Testing Terminology series has been helpful. If you would like more information in regards to our acoustic design and sound insulation testing services, please contact us at info@aptsoundtesting.co.uk or visit our website at: www.aptsoundtesting.co.uk

Sound Testing Terminology (2 of 3)

Sound Testing Terminology (2 of 3)

Often confusion can arise from the large amount of ‘terms’ used in conjunction with acoustic design and sound insulation testing. To help with this we have made a list of the following terms for clarity – this is the second of three blogs:

Façade Testing  – This Standard – ISO 140-5:1998) specifies the testing methods to evaluate the sound insulation in buildings and building elements for facades. Three rounds of a proficiency testing scheme for airborne sound insulation measurements have been performed according to the methods specified in the standard for a whole facade by using an external loudspeaker as the noise source.

sound testing equipment

Flanking element (flanking wall) – This is any building element that contributes to the airborne sound or impact transmission between rooms in a building which is not the direct separating element (i.e. not the separating wall or separating floor).

Flanking strip or edge strip – This is a resilient strip using foamed polyethylene normally 5 mm thick, which is located at the perimeter of a floor to isolate the floor boards from the walls and skirting.

Flanking transmission  – This is airborne or impact transmission between rooms that is transmitted via flanking elements and/or flanking elements in conjunction with the main separating elements. An example of a flanking element is the inner leaf of an external wall that connects to the separating ‘core’ of a wall or floor.

Flexible closer – This is a flexible cavity stop or cavity barrier which seals the air path in cavities linking adjoining dwellings.

Floating floor treatment (FFT) – This is a timber floating floor system which may use battens, cradles or platform base, all of which use a resilient layer to provide isolation from the base floor and adjacent wall elements.

Gypsum based plasterboard  – This is a dry lining board applied to walls, ceilings and within floating floor treatments which has gypsum content. It may also have fibre reinforcement within the board.

Impact sound – This is sound which is propagated from a noise source through a direct medium. An example of this is footfall on a floor.

Impact sound transmission – This is sound which is spread from an impact noise source in direct contact with a building element.

We hope the above information in regards to Sound Testing Terminology has been helpful. If you would like more information in regards to acoustic design and sound testing services, please contact us at info@aptsoundtesting.co.uk or visit our website at: www.aptsoundtesting.co.uk

GOOD ACOUSTIC DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION

GOOD ACOUSTIC DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION

Unfortunately there are many misconceptions when it comes to acoustic design and construction. Unfortunately by simply constructing a good separating wall or floor this may not in itself provide sufficient sound insulation to pass the sound testing for Part E as the junctions of each separating wall and/or floor with other parts of the building are equally as important. There may be other potential issues such as flanking sound transmission that can occur via construction components such as:

  1. the internal partitions
  2. the inner leaf of the external wall
  3. the external wall cavities
  4. the external façade or outer leaf
  5. the roof structure
  6. the foundations.

The overall design and construction system should therefore be considered and not just the separating wall or floor partitions.  Flanking sound transmission may in some cases be the dominant pathway between adjoining dwellings, especially in existing buildings where you are planning to convert offices/large houses into flats where there are large existing penetrations through the floors.

NoiseFlankingWall

Also, it is never safe to assume because the architect has specified high performance walls, windows and floor/ceiling assemblies that the materials and onsite workmanship will result in compliance with the anticipated results. You should usually reduce the acoustic target by 4-5dB due to onsite construction. When the construction assembly is tested in the lab, it is also certified and the installation techniques are described and undertaken in great detail.  Unfortunately it is not always possible to replicate the exact conditions on the site compared to the ideal conditions within in a lab setting, which is a far more controlled and scrutinised environment. This is the reason why a 5 point difference is allowed between the construction design on paper and the actual on site sound insulation performance.

APT Sound Testing can advise on all types of acoustic design, whether it’s accomplished during initial construction or during a refurbishment/renovation project.  We have the technical experience to help identify and rectify your soundproofing or noise control problem.

If you would like more information in regards to sound testing please follow our blog at: http://soundtestinguk.blogspot.co.uk or contact us at: info@aptsoundtesting.co.uk or visit our website at: www.aptsoundtesting.co.uk

Broken Down Rating Methods for Sound Testing

Broken Down Rating Methods for Sound Testing 

The sound insulation rating methods that follow are defined in:

Sound insulation testing is usually undertaken near the end of a project to show that the party wall and floor partitions meet the standards shown in Building Regulations Approved Document E.  The method for testing for airborne and impact sound insulation is in full accordance with: the suggested methods presented in BS EN ISO 140-parts 4 & 7: 1998. Sound tests are broken down into various rating methods.

sound testing equipment

The sound insulation rating methods that follow are defined in:

 Rating Method – RW

This single figure rating method is the rating used for laboratory airborne sound insulation tests. The figure indicates the amount of sound energy being stopped by a separating building element when tested in isolation in the absence of any flanking paths.

 Rating Method – DnTw

The single figure rating method that gives the airborne sound insulation performance between two adjacent rooms within a building as measured within site conditions. The result achieved is affected not only by the separating element also by the surrounding structure and junction details.

 Rating Method – Ctr

The Ctr adaptation term is a correction that can be added to either the RW (laboratory) or DnTw (site) airborne rating. The Ctr term is used because it targets the low frequency performance of a building element and in particular the performance achieved in the 100 – 315 Hz frequency range. This term was originally developed to describe how a building element would perform if subject to excessive low frequency sound sources, such as traffic and railway noise. This rating is expressed as RW + Ctr and allows the acoustic designer to critically compare performances. The rating method has not been universally welcomed. Some

acousticians believe that the method is too crude as it only considers the low frequency performance, and because site measurements at low frequencies are prone to difficulties, which can lead to a lack of confidence in the results achieved.

 Rating Method – Lnw

This single figure rating method is the rating used forclaboratory impact sound insulation tests on separating floors. The figure indicates the amount of sound energy being transmitted through the floor tested in isolation, in the absence of any flanking paths. With impact sound insulation, the lower the figure the better the performance.

Rating Method – LnTw

The single figure rating method that is used for impact sound insulation tests for floors. The figure indicates the sound insulation performance between two adjacent rooms within a building as measured on site. The result achieved is affected not only by the separating floor but also by the surrounding structure, e.g. flanking walls and associated junction details.

Rating Method – Dncw

The single figure laboratory rating method, which is used for evaluating the airborne sound insulation performance of suspended ceilings. Laboratory tests simulate the room-to-room performance of the suspended ceiling when a partition is built up to the underside of the ceiling with sound transmitted via the plenum.

APT Sound Testing can advise on all types of acoustic design, whether it’s accomplished during initial construction or during a refurbishment/renovation project.  We have the technical experience to help identify and rectify your soundproofing or noise control problem.

If you would like more information in regards to sound testing please follow our blog at: http://soundtestinguk.blogspot.co.uk or contact us at: info@aptsoundtesting.co.uk or visit our website at: www.aptsoundtesting.co.uk

The different types of Sound Testing

The different types of Sound Testing.

There are two distinct types of noise to consider through floors, they are:

  • Airborne Noise (for example speech and music) and
  • Impact Noise (for example footsteps directly on the floor above)

To take this into account there are two different types of Sound Testing required in compliance with Approved Document Part E. Even if both types of sound are emitting through the ceiling/floor then there are some easy installations that should reduce the sound levels and improve your sound test results.

sound testing equipment

To help our clients overcome this problem, we also offer our acoustic design service which helps clients to pass the sound testing upon completion of the acoustic upgrade. By advising on a simple cost effective wall and/or floor upgrade, we are able to forward simple to follow acoustic design reviews, utilising our extensive knowledge of different materials and construction methods. Using this philosophy, to date, we have had no sound test failures where our acoustic upgrades have been incorporated into the site construction, ensuring compliance with Part E of Building Regulations.

Pre-completion sound testing has been a mandatory requirement since July 2003 and all new build properties and conversions which were built after this date require 10% of each party wall/floor construction type to be tested. The Sound testing is to be carried out between pairs of rooms separated by party walls and/or floors. Part E stipulates that it sound testing should take place between dividing partitions between living rooms and bedrooms as these are classed as the two main habitable rooms; however, other rooms can be used if this is not possible such as dining rooms, kitchen and studies.

APT Sound Testing can undertake UKAS accredited Part E sound testing throughout England and Wales. Our sound test engineers carry all the latest class 1 acoustic equipment and we provide full UKAS accredited air and sound testing, so our clients can be sure that all testing is completed to the strictest  ISO quality controlled standards.

If you would like advice on your acoustic design or sound testing in London, please contact us now at info@aptsoundtesting.co.uk or call us on 07775623464