The Different Types of Sound Insulation Testing

The Different Types of Sound Insulation Testing

Sound Testing has been mandatory requirement since July 2003. All new build dwellings and conversions which were built after this date require 10% of each party wall/floor construction type to be tested.

Sound Insulation Tests needs to be carried out between pairs of rooms separated by party walls or floors, i.e. in block of flats you would undertake airborne testing across the walls and floors; and impact tests across the floors.

Sound_Testing_Flats

You usually try to undertake testing between the two main habitable rooms, such as living rooms and bedrooms. The sound test procedure involves setting up a noise source in a room on one side of the party wall or floor and measuring the noise on both sides of the partition with a class 1 analyser.

Airborne Sound Insulation Tests

Airborne sound insulation tests may be required between horizontally and vertically separated pairs of rooms. The sound tests are undertaken by using a sound source, amplifier and loudspeaker to generate a high noise level in one room (the source room). Noise measurements are then taken in both the source and receiver rooms using a prescribed number of source and microphone positions.

Sample_Sound__Testing

The background levels in the receiver room are measured and the reverberation time in the receiver room is also measured. From the results, the airborne sound insulation (DnT,w + Ctr) is calculated and compared to the requirements of Approved Document E.

Impact Sound Insulation Tests

For vertically separated rooms Impact sound Insulation testing may also be required. This sound test is undertaken using a “tapping machine”, (as above) which drops a series of weights onto the floor of the upper room. The noise level in the lower (receiver) room is measured for a prescribed number of source and microphone locations. The background levels in the receiver room are measured and the reverberation time in the receiver room is also measured. From the results, the impact sound insulation (L’nT,w) is calculated and compared to the requirements of Approved Document E.

Impact Sound Testing

We use the latest Norsonic equipment, which is class one rating and UKAS calibrated. We are a UKAS and ISO accredited company, so you can be assured all our testing is carried out to the strictest quality controlled standards.

If you would like more information in regards to sound testing please follow our blog at: http://soundtestinguk.blogspot.co.uk/, or contact me (Darren) on 07775 623464 ot email us at info@aptsoundtesting.co.uk

Acoustic Design and Sound Testing

Acoustic Design and Sound Testing

We are currently experiencing a large rise in the amount of housing stock that’s requiring sound testing throughout the UK. As commercial buildings such as offices etc. are converted into residential dwellings sound testing then becomes are requirement under Part E of building regulations. We have carried out a large amount of sound testing in office conversions with varying success as office buildings are not usually designed with acoustics in-mind.

Noise_Problems_Failed_Sound_Testing

To reduce the chance of a sound test failure, it is imperative that flanking transmission is considered at the design stage and any construction detailing is specified to minimise any potential of noise flanking which will downgrade the acoustic performance. Good detailing at the design stage will minimise this effect and optimise the overall levels of acoustic privacy achieved. If designing for residential units, design advice on flanking details must be followed to maximise the possibility of achieving the specified acoustic performance. It is imperative that the design advice is followed, otherwise the site sound insulation values may not meet the performance criteria required and subsequent expensive remedial treatment may be required.

When offices are converted into dwellings we often undertake sample sound testing to check the existing sound levels prior to the commencement of works, once we have established the sound test results we can then come up with a more cost effective design to comply with Part E of Building Regulations.

Historically we have found that if the floor structure is a typical 200mm concrete slab the sample airborne results are coming close to the requirements of Part E without any modifications to the existing slab; however, the impact results are poor. This is because the airborne sound is broken down by the mass of the concrete slab, therefore sounds such as speech & TV etc. are minimised. Unfortunately, impact sound results are poor due to the lack of isolation within the slab, therefore the sound travels straight through the slab to the area below. Sound such as people walking can be very loud and unacceptable.

To help reduce potential control noise issues APT Sound Testing can undertake an acoustic  design review of the floors after sample sound testing to ensure both the airborne and impact sound tests pass Part E of Building Regulations. Using our extensive knowledge regarding the way different materials and construction methods can influence the results of sound testing we can offer easy to follow acoustic advice on the most awkward developments.

Acoustic_Design_Service

If you would like more information in regards to sound testing please follow our blog at: http://soundtestinguk.blogspot.co.uk or contact us at: info@aptsoundtesting.co.uk and 07775623464 or visit our website at: www.aptsoundtesting.co.uk