Noise Damping to Improve Sound Testing

Noise Damping to Improve Sound Testing 

Noise damping is the most efficient and effective ways to control vibration and noise radiation at the source. Damping materials lessen this noise by turning the vibration into a low-grade heat. By using viscoelastic materials, it changes the resonant frequency of a substrate. By combining vibration damping materials and sound absorbers a composite acoustic construction can be achieved, that can control both airborne and structure borne noise – the final element for good soundproofing.

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It is worth noting that a  large number of manufacturers now produce a wide range of systems designed to improve sound insulation in homes and commercial buildings. In all instances, the effectiveness of these materials will vary depending on the situation in which they are installed. When choosing the acoustic product/s, detailed information on the likely sound insulation performance should be requested from the supplier. If you have an existing property you should check the existing construction of the dividing wall/floor partitions and work back from there. You are advised to give careful consideration to the data supplied by a manufacturer before using a proprietary product. it is also worth noting that the sound insulation value/s given for each product will be ‘best case’ as they have been tested in laboratory conditions and not on site – this is usually worse result by up to 3-5 dB) which may be the difference between a sound test pass or failure.

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Also when undertaking remedial work to improve the sound insulation, the acoustic materials are often quite heavy which may result in considerable weight being added to the structure of a property. Thus it is essential to check that the ceiling or floor joists can carry the increased loads satisfactorily.

So in a nutshell if you allow for the following four main elements of sound insulation on your acoustic partition design; Decoupling, Absorption, Mass and Damping, your development should pass the sound insulation test at the first attempt.

If you would like more information in regards to acoustic design and sound insulation testing, please contact us now at info@aptsoundtesting.co.uk or call Darren direct on 07775623464.

Adding Mass to Improve Sound Insulation

Adding Mass to Improve Sound Insulation

Adding mass to improve sound insulation can be one of the most important elements to improving precompletion sound testing results. In summary it basically means you add extra weight/mass to the construction of the acoustic wall and/or floor partition. Materials such as solid block-work masonry is best for wall construction; however it is very important that the block-work envelope is constructed out of solid concrete block work as the use of lightweight block work often ends in sound test failure.

Sound_Insulation_Test_London

 For floor construction, solid concrete floors – min 150mm) are usually the best construction for outright mass; however soundboard, plywood and OSB can be found fairly cheaply and will also do the job – if installed as per manufacturer’s guidelines. It is very important that adequate site supervision is on hand to check the construction of all acoustic partitions.

It is basic physics, so for sound to conduct through a wall, it has to actually move (vibrate) the wall ever so slightly. As a heavier wall is harder to move than a lighter wall then it should vibrate less and turn let through less noise. Soundboard is one of the lowest cost sources of mass available and also one of the most commonly used. Wherever possible its best to use two layers of 12.5mm board with the correct laps to the boards. Although the wall will still vibrate it will be less due to the extra mass.

It’s worth noting that although the added mass improved things and it will be more difficult for sound to move this heavier wall, in many instances you will still hear low frequencies (bass noise) quite easily.

Our next blog covers the last – but not least) element of acoustic design – Damping. If you would like more information in regards to acoustic design and sound insulation testing, please contact us now at info@aptsoundtesting.co.uk or call Darren direct on 07775623464.

Noise Absorption

Noise Absorption

It is usual for air cavities to resonate, such as the cavity within a timber wall. For instance if you blow across the top of a bottle and heard the sound, it sounds much louder; this is the trapped air resonating. In a similar way a hollow wall will also trap air that will resonate. When the wall is vibrated by loud sound such as a neighbour’s loud music of TV, the air in the wall cavity will vibrate just like a drum. Unfortunately this air cavity is another means for sound vibration to travel from one side of the acoustic partition wall to the other. So even though the wall framing may be decoupled, the vibrating air cavity may still transmit some sound through the wall between the wall studs. Acoustic fiberglass insulation will absorb some of this (absorption).

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In all instances acoustic Insulation should help the overall sound insulation test result, and should always be installed if possible. Although the vibration reduction is smaller than the other 3 elements it is still very important.  The key is to keep the density low, so don’t try to compress or pack the insulation as the vibration may use this to bridge the construction.

So to summarise we have now managed to de-couple and insulated the acoustic wall framing, which has helped to stop much of the vibration, but unfortunately not all of it. So what else can we do? – add mass of course. A full explanation of how mass can help your sound test results can be found in the next blog.

If you require any information on our acoustic design and/or sound test services, please contact us at info@aptsoundtesting.co.uk or call Darren on 07775623464.

Decoupling of Materials

Decoupling of Materials

There are many things to consider with your acoustic design and construction, one of the first – and most important) is the decoupling of materials or also know as isolation of materials. Sound travels easily along direct construction pathways, i.e. if the construction is made up of a wooden wall frame with a layer of plasterboard fixed to either side, with this type of construction the sound has a solid mass of materials to travel across. If we “decouple the materials” it reduces the pathway for vibration and the sound levels drop accordingly.

When we design for acoustic partition construction we obviously want less sound vibration to travel from one side of the wall to the other. It is therefore hugely beneficial if we can decouple the partition framing in our walls and ceilings. Decoupling is a simple, inexpensive and highly effective way to improve the sound insulation results for Building Regulations Part E.  .

There are many types of decoupled construction that in turn offer varying degrees of separation of the drywall on one side from the drywall on the other side. For instance the image below shows a twin wall construction which is far superior to a single stud wall. if you require good sound test results, this is one of the best types of construction.

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By decoupling the wall studs limits by providing a cavity or break between the two walls reduces the vibration trying to conduct through the wall. although this will improves the airborne results, other improvements will still be required.  So although our decoupled framing system reduces a good deal of vibration, we need to continue to the other 3 elements, absorption, mass, and to damping to reduce the noise more effectively.

Our next blog will consider absorption and how it can make a  large difference to sound test results. If you would like more information to acoustic design and/or sound insulation testing please contact us at: info@aptsoundtesting.co.uk or call Darren on 07775623464.

The Main Sound Proofing Elements

The main Sound Proofing Elements

Coupled Wall Construction

We often get asked ‘how can we improve our soundproofing on our development. The first thing to understand is the basic of soundproofing design and construction. If you understand the basics, you’ll have a more educated view point in regards to the way sound and vibration behaves within your new dwellings. Basically, we want to stop sound and vibration through the walls and floors of your development and one of the best ways of doing this is avoiding coupled wall construction. In general, we are trying to stop vibrations from getting to “your” side of the wall or ceiling.

The plate below shows a typical wall and noise problems associated with it. With this type of construction noise transference is a big problem. If there is even moderate levels of noise on one side of the wall the chances are you will hear it.

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If you look at the red arrows in the above diagram it clearly shows how sound is conducted from one side of the wall to the other. As the wall elements are firmly fixed against each other, i.e. the plasterboard is rigidly connected to the timber, the vibration conducts straight through the whole wall construction.

If you look at the blue waves this indicates airborne transmission. The plasterboard is vibrating back and forth which produces a sound wave in the wall cavity. This, in turn, vibrates the plasterboard on the opposite side of the wall. the whole construction acts like a  huge diaphragm or like a large speaker with both sides of the wall vibrating in unison, which is not ideal.

Our next blog will explain how we can reduce noise transmission by decoupling the wall construction. if you would like more information on our sound testing or acoustic design services please contact us now at: info@aptsoundtesting.co.uk or call Darren direct on 07775623464.