GOOD ACOUSTIC DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION

GOOD ACOUSTIC DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION

Unfortunately there are many misconceptions when it comes to acoustic design and construction. Unfortunately by simply constructing a good separating wall or floor this may not in itself provide sufficient sound insulation to pass the sound testing for Part E as the junctions of each separating wall and/or floor with other parts of the building are equally as important. There may be other potential issues such as flanking sound transmission that can occur via construction components such as:

  1. the internal partitions
  2. the inner leaf of the external wall
  3. the external wall cavities
  4. the external façade or outer leaf
  5. the roof structure
  6. the foundations.

The overall design and construction system should therefore be considered and not just the separating wall or floor partitions.  Flanking sound transmission may in some cases be the dominant pathway between adjoining dwellings, especially in existing buildings where you are planning to convert offices/large houses into flats where there are large existing penetrations through the floors.

NoiseFlankingWall

Also, it is never safe to assume because the architect has specified high performance walls, windows and floor/ceiling assemblies that the materials and onsite workmanship will result in compliance with the anticipated results. You should usually reduce the acoustic target by 4-5dB due to onsite construction. When the construction assembly is tested in the lab, it is also certified and the installation techniques are described and undertaken in great detail.  Unfortunately it is not always possible to replicate the exact conditions on the site compared to the ideal conditions within in a lab setting, which is a far more controlled and scrutinised environment. This is the reason why a 5 point difference is allowed between the construction design on paper and the actual on site sound insulation performance.

APT Sound Testing can advise on all types of acoustic design, whether it’s accomplished during initial construction or during a refurbishment/renovation project.  We have the technical experience to help identify and rectify your soundproofing or noise control problem.

If you would like more information in regards to sound testing please follow our blog at: http://soundtestinguk.blogspot.co.uk or contact us at: info@aptsoundtesting.co.uk or visit our website at: www.aptsoundtesting.co.uk

Broken Down Rating Methods for Sound Testing

Broken Down Rating Methods for Sound Testing 

The sound insulation rating methods that follow are defined in:

Sound insulation testing is usually undertaken near the end of a project to show that the party wall and floor partitions meet the standards shown in Building Regulations Approved Document E.  The method for testing for airborne and impact sound insulation is in full accordance with: the suggested methods presented in BS EN ISO 140-parts 4 & 7: 1998. Sound tests are broken down into various rating methods.

sound testing equipment

The sound insulation rating methods that follow are defined in:

 Rating Method – RW

This single figure rating method is the rating used for laboratory airborne sound insulation tests. The figure indicates the amount of sound energy being stopped by a separating building element when tested in isolation in the absence of any flanking paths.

 Rating Method – DnTw

The single figure rating method that gives the airborne sound insulation performance between two adjacent rooms within a building as measured within site conditions. The result achieved is affected not only by the separating element also by the surrounding structure and junction details.

 Rating Method – Ctr

The Ctr adaptation term is a correction that can be added to either the RW (laboratory) or DnTw (site) airborne rating. The Ctr term is used because it targets the low frequency performance of a building element and in particular the performance achieved in the 100 – 315 Hz frequency range. This term was originally developed to describe how a building element would perform if subject to excessive low frequency sound sources, such as traffic and railway noise. This rating is expressed as RW + Ctr and allows the acoustic designer to critically compare performances. The rating method has not been universally welcomed. Some

acousticians believe that the method is too crude as it only considers the low frequency performance, and because site measurements at low frequencies are prone to difficulties, which can lead to a lack of confidence in the results achieved.

 Rating Method – Lnw

This single figure rating method is the rating used forclaboratory impact sound insulation tests on separating floors. The figure indicates the amount of sound energy being transmitted through the floor tested in isolation, in the absence of any flanking paths. With impact sound insulation, the lower the figure the better the performance.

Rating Method – LnTw

The single figure rating method that is used for impact sound insulation tests for floors. The figure indicates the sound insulation performance between two adjacent rooms within a building as measured on site. The result achieved is affected not only by the separating floor but also by the surrounding structure, e.g. flanking walls and associated junction details.

Rating Method – Dncw

The single figure laboratory rating method, which is used for evaluating the airborne sound insulation performance of suspended ceilings. Laboratory tests simulate the room-to-room performance of the suspended ceiling when a partition is built up to the underside of the ceiling with sound transmitted via the plenum.

APT Sound Testing can advise on all types of acoustic design, whether it’s accomplished during initial construction or during a refurbishment/renovation project.  We have the technical experience to help identify and rectify your soundproofing or noise control problem.

If you would like more information in regards to sound testing please follow our blog at: http://soundtestinguk.blogspot.co.uk or contact us at: info@aptsoundtesting.co.uk or visit our website at: www.aptsoundtesting.co.uk