What is a Planning Noise Survey

What is a Planning Noise Survey

A planning noise survey needs to be carried out by a suitably qualified acoustic consultant, preferably UKAS accredited in acoustics. APT is UKAS accredited for acoustic surveys and we have vast amount of experience and skill in dealing with BS4142 noise assessments and PPG24 Noise Surveys for the planning applications for both small and large businesses and developments throughout London and the United Kingdom. All you need to do is send us a site plan layout showing the site along with the nearest noise sources such as a main road or railway line. Once received we will send you a quotation for a noise survey – it’s as simple as that!

sound testing

Noise Surveys for New Developments

A noise survey and report should be submitted during the pre-application process and discussions on planning applications. In many circumstances a planning condition will stipulate that a noise survey will need to be undertaken.

Noise surveys are normally carried out prior to completion, however the local authority may also require post a BS 8182 noise level survey to prove that the noise standards have been achieved within the living rooms and bedrooms.

The following information will usually need to be included within the noise survey report.

  1. The reason and scope of the report.
  2. Location plan of the proposed development and likely receptor points such as the nearest residential window/s.
  3. The noise survey Methodology including the noise monitoring location, the equipment used and the weather conditions during the noise survey.
  4. Reasons for deviations from standard methods.
  5. Full table of results.
  6. A comparison of survey results against the noise standards.
  7. Recommendations for noise control measures – acoustic barriers etc.
  8. Full calculations against noise reductions expected to support any suggested noise control measures.

When is a noise survey and PPG24 report required?

A noise survey and PPG24 report may be required at the application stage or once planning

permission has been granted. A noise survey and report are required if:

  • the proposed development with commercial areas that may create noise which may affect nearby noise sensitive properties. For example, a new commercial activity near existing residential properties.
  • the proposed development positioning will be sensitive to noise and is likely to be affected by existing noise sources i.e. busy roads, railway, airports or commercial activity.

What is the noise Survey report for?

The noise survey report is to demonstrate that:

  • the source of noise is evaluated and quantified
  • nearby noise sensitive receptors identified
  • noise receptors have been determined with reference to noise standards

 The noise survey report (where required) will also set out control measures where it is necessary to reduce noise to acceptable levels. For example, the installation of different glazing e.g. from double to triple glazed panels or acoustic trickle vents are installed so that internal noise standards are met.

If you would like more information on BS4142 noise survey or PPG24 noise surveys for your business or development, please contact us at: info@airpressuretesting.net or visit our website at: www.airpressuretesting.net  Bye for now APT

SOUND TESTING AND THE MAIN NOISE FLANKING PATHS

SOUND TESTING AND THE MAIN NOISE FLANKING PATHS

One of the most common reasons for partitions failing the sound testing is down to noise flanking between partitions.

Noise Flanking is a term used by acoustic engineers wherein the sound passes over the top or under the primary partition separating the two spaces under test. Flanking sound transmission can be especially bothersome in multi-family residential buildings do to the sheer number of dividing partitions.

One way to reduce the chance of to flanking transmission/s is at the design phase of the dwelling. Unfortunately, by Simply specifying high performance wall and floor partitions between dwelling is no guarantee to a sound isolation and subsequently a successful sound test. APT Sound Testing offer both preconstruction and post construction design solutions to achieve the required sound isolation requirements of Part E of Building Regulations.

This Plate Shows The Main Air Leakage Paths

NoiseFlankingWall

We also offer an acoustic onsite inspection service to ensure that the sound insulation elements are being installed as per manufactures guild lines and the quality of the workmanship is consistent with ‘best practice’ noise control procedures.

You can also undertake you own checks by asking the design consultant i.e. the architect or the builder what steps have been taken to insure your building will be sound adequately sound proofed from your neighbours and from noise intrusion through perimeter envelope from outside the building, after all there isn’t any point your dwelling having high spec acoustic insulation between the inner partitions if sound is transferring through the outer envelope.

 It is never safe to assume because the architect has specified high performance walls, windows and floor/ceiling assemblies that the materials and onsite workmanship will result in compliance with the anticipated results and ultimately a successful sound test. In all these instances successful sound isolation in your home depends on the workmanship during the sound insulation installation phase, the problem is the site installer may know little about noise control techniques unless he is give the right supervision and direction the construction phase.

Part E of Building Regulations stipulates the minimum standards for noise control between residential dwelling units. Upon completion of the building the Building inspection department will need the sound test certification prior to the issue a certificate of occupancy. This shows that the building meets minimum building code standards including sound isolation.

Typical Flanking Sound Transmission Pathways:

  • Dividing Floors – Through Floor and Floor Joist Space (if insulation has not been installed or direct fixing to joists without a drop ceiling below the partition under test)
  • Dividing Ceilings – Above and Through the Ceiling Space (where an adequate acoustic break has not been carried on through the ceiling void)
  • Through Structural Steel (structural steel beams are often a major cause of noise transmission as plasterboard is often fixed directly to the steel without sound breaks)
  • Shared Structural Building Components – Floor Boards, Floor Joists, Continuous Drywall Partitions, Continuous Concrete Floors, and Cement Block Walls.
  • Through Windows (if they are no double glazed or have secondary glazing as a minimum)
  • Fixtures & Outlets – Light Switches, Telephone Outlets, and Recessed Lighting Fixtures (if penetrations have been cut back to back with the opposite dwelling under test)
  • Structural Joints – Perimeter Joints at Wall & Floor, Through Wall & Ceiling Junctures (these should be filled with acoustic mastic)
  • Plumbing Chases – Junctures Between the Walls & Floor Slab Above or at the Exterior Wall Juncture (this should be filed with mortar etc. to add mass to this weakened area)
  • Around the End of the Partition Through the Adjacent Wall (acoustic mastic should be used to seal this junction)

Even if you your wall/floor has been designed so it should provide a high acoustic rating exceeding Part E requirements, this may not be enough. Unfortunately, sound will always find the weakest link, for instance construction workers will usually jack the plasterboard tight to the ceiling in order to achieve a nice tight joint at the ceiling. This often leaves a void or potential noise transference point at the floor/wall junction, which will eventually be covered with a piece of thin skirting board. Failure to fill the joint between the wall and the floor with acoustic mastic can reduce even a 50dB rated wall to under 40dB which will fail the minimum standard of 45dB for sound insulation testing as stipulated within the Building Regulations Part E.

This Video Clearly Shows Sound Flanking Through a Wall

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=edhLno7LFzY

Often the sound insulation manufacture will provide test lab results for their material. However, you should usually reduce the acoustic target by 4-5dB due to onsite construction. When the construction assembly is tested in the lab it is also certified and the installation techniques are described in detail.  Unfortunately it is not always possible to replicate the exact conditions on the site compared to the ideal conditions within in a lab setting, which is a far more controlled and scrutinised environment. This is the reason why a 5 point difference is allowed between the construction design on paper and the actual on site performance.

APT Sound Testing can advise on all types of acoustic design, whether it’s accomplished during initial construction or during a refurbishment/renovation project.  We have the technical experience to help identify and rectify your soundproofing or noise control problem.

If you would like more information in regards to sound testing please follow our blog at: http://soundtestinguk.blogspot.co.uk or contact us at: info@aptsoundtesting.co.uk or visit our website at: www.aptsoundtesting.co.uk

ROBUST ACOUSTIC DESIGN FOR SUCCESSFUL SOUND TESTING

ROBUST ACOUSTIC DESIGN FOR SUCCESSFUL SOUND TESTING

The first stage of the any project is to undertake robust acoustic design for successful sound testing.  To start this process you need to send  through the design drawings for review, including elevations & sections etc. APT can then review the design detailing to check that the construction details proposed are capable of passing the sound tests. This usually takes place straight after planning has been approved as increased cost savings can be realised at the earliest stage.

ACOUSTIC_DESIGN

APT Sound Testing will evaluate the construction methods and materials specified to ensure that they are capable of meeting the acoustic requirements of Approved document E and subsequently pass the sound testing. The typical areas we check are:

  • The wall and floor design are acoustically robust, to comply with Building Regulations Part E.
  • Check there are no potential flanking points, where isolated partitions are wrongly mechanically fixed together to caused noise bridging.
  • The acoustic treatments for Soil Pipes, Stair Cases Steel Beams etc. to ensure they are acoustically fit for purpose, as these are some of the many areas that get missed that can lead to sound test failure.
  • The Lighting specification to, ensure they are acoustically complaint to the overall design i.e. down lighter design etc.
  • Acoustic floor treatments are compatible with the proposed floor finishes i.e. Carpets, Laminates, Floor Tiles and under floor heating systems.

 If you would like more information in regards to acoustic design and/or sound testing please follow our blog at: http://soundtestinguk.blogspot.co.uk/, or contact us at: info@aptsoundtesting.co.uk or visit our website at: www.aptsoundtesting.co.uk

 

 

NOISE FLANKING ON YOUR PROJECT

NOISE FLANKING ON YOUR PROJECT

If you fail your Sound Test, you first you need to understand how the sound is travelling into your home. It may be coming directly through the separating partition, i.e. wall or floor or it may be coming along another indirect route – called a flanking path. The most common such flanking path is the inner leaf of an external cavity wall.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=edhLno7LFzY

 Problems with airborne and structure borne sound are often associated with direct flanking transmissions through floors and supporting walls and other associated structures. It is essential to establish if your problem is due to direct transmission, flanking transmission or a combination of both so that the most effective remedial treatment can be chosen. If you are unsure where the sound is getting through, then contact us at info@aptsoundtesting.co.uk  as we should be able to identify the worst areas by undertaking sound testing on the problematic partitions.

NoiseFlankingWall

 Unwanted noise travelling along flanking paths makes the building structure vibrate and this causes the sound to radiate into your room. One solution is to build another wall or ceiling in front of the original, but not connected to it (often called an independent wall or ceiling). A basic description of this treatment is given below.

There are two distinct types of noise to consider through floors, they are:

  • Airborne Noise (for example speech and music) and
  • Impact Noise (for example footsteps directly on the floor above) and

Even if both types of sound are emitting through the ceiling/floor then there are some easy installations that should reduce the sound levels and improve your sound test results.

If you would like more information in regards to sound testing please follow our blog at: http://soundtestinguk.blogspot.co.uk/, or contact us at: info@aptsoundtesting.co.uk or visit our website at: www.aptsoundtesting.co.uk